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With our self imposed budget, steeped in thriftiness, we began along look at our basic camping gear need. But before we stepped out the door to start looking at equipment and accessories, someone had suggested that we take a look at RV.net.Image of RV.Net Logo We wound up spending hours on this site getting reviews, information and suggestions from a lot of people who had been doing this for a long time! One of the first major things we did wasImage of Yamaha EF2400iS generator with cord plugged in to purchase a Yamaha EF2400 generator for those times that we wanted to camp somewhere that didn’t provide water and electricity.

 

At the time this generator was rated to be the second quietest generator on the market, next to the Honda. Our trailer also came with a 20 gal. fresh water tank with water pump attached. This generator could easily power everything in the trailer and also recharge the attached battery. The beauty of the EF2400 is that it will also power a lot of the air conditioners and/or microwave ovens that you may find in a camping or travel trailer.

Other General Items…

 

A few of the other items that you would want to purchase are a hose for the fresh water supply system, a 15 to 30 amp adapter, a waste water tote, a good hatchet, a spade, a small electric tire compressor (just in case), a small package of spare fuses, a couple of rolls of duct tape and maybe a small tool kit, an inexpensive torque wrench for the tires, maybe an inexpensive voltage meter, sewage hose and attachment, sewage tank treatment chemicals, water filter and a water pressure regulator. Most of the time when you buy a trailer from a reputable dealer, they will include a Image of RV Accessory Starter Kit usually given by dealership with purchase of RV.“starter’s kit” in the transaction that has a sewer hose assembly, a 15 to 30 amp adapter, a fresh water hose, a water pressure regulator and a small box of black water tank treatment chemicals and occasionally a water filter.

Can’t Forget the Fishing Gear…

 

Probably the most import items that you’ll want to consider are some inexpensive fishing rod and reels and fishing gear to get started with. As you progressively go out and explore a little further each time, you’ll discover your favorite campgrounds and sites to enjoy on those occasions that you can get away from the daily grind of the city. Along with these experiences you’ll find those wonderful creeks and lakes where the trout continually call you back. As you travel more and more you will discover what types of tools, accessories and even fishing gear that really complete each get-away for you.

For us, even now, it remains all about the fishing, the surrounding beauty of nature and nights filled with campfires, marshmallows and a wonderful musical background filled with the howling of the distant coyotes and creatures.

Pets, Dogs and Other Critters…

 

Another area to cover at a point in time would be pets and how to camp with them, in our case, a couple of dogs. There are several important issues to discuss, including camping equipment for dogs, but the most important issue regarding dogs is the issue of containment and behavior. The major equipment that you’ll need for your dogs really Image of a Bark Collar for dogsdepends on their training and their maturity.

Our youngest dog is a maltipoo and is still in the yelper stage. We always take a plastic portable pen for her when she’s outside. The other important piece of equipment for her is a good effective bark collar. The one that we use is highly effective on her and is very seldomly required at this point.

Just a quick mention on the bark collars; they can be a little expensive but if you’ll keep your eyes open for some camping gear equipment sales in the Walmart camping equipment, Kmart camping equipment or your local/favorite camping gear equipment sales outlet, you should do O.K. Just remember that if your bark collar is effective enough, you probably won’t need it very long.

It All Comes Down to Good Training…

 

To a great point, this all comes down to previous training. Many times we have had to deal with coyotes, deer and bears. There are also mountain cats, bob cats and rattlesnakes and each dog can handle situations differently. It really does come down to training. It is not a must, but it is extremely helpful if you can control your dog successfully using your voice. Most campgrounds in California, whether county, state or federal hold strictly to dogs being on a leash at all times. I have to admit there’s a lot to be said for adhering to these rules.                                             

Fishing With My Dog…

 
Image of Randy stream fishing at Robinson Creek with Kaylee GirlHowever, for my older dog, stream fishing for trout just isn’t fishing if she can’t go in the water after them. Such was an incident this past summer high up in the Eastern Sierras at Paha Campground on the Robinson Creek. I had turned her loose for a quick swim while we moved down stream to another promising hole when we both came around the corner, face to face with a pretty good sized doe. Fortunately for me, my girl always gives me 3 to 4 seconds to give her a command before she goes into chase mode and in this situation I just had her sit while the deer made her exit. Again, that’s all part of the excitement of camping and fishing. After a few seasons of camping, a lot of things begin to fall in place such as when and where to get your fresh water, when and where to dispose of your dirty water and when and where to dispose of your sewage.

Organization, Never Overrated…

 

One of the best things that my wife ever did was to create an Excel spreadsheet with Link to our downloadable camping checklist.every, single possible item that we take, whether it’s food, clothes, firewood, gas for the generator or trout bait. It also includes every task that needs to be completed before departure, such as adjusting the sprinkler system or stopping the mail and newspaper. The best camping is when you’ve developed a system and gotten packing and unpacking down to a science.

A Work in Progress…

 
But none of this comes together over night; it all takes time and experience. I hope this will give you a few pointers but more important I hope that it will encourage you to join us. Whether you’re winter camping California on the Golden Coast in the Big Sur, enjoying the spring time at Dos Picos in Ramona, or pulling the big ones out of the Walker River on the backside of Yosemite in the middle of the summer, there is never anything quite like the joy of experiencing nature up close and personal in the great State of California.

By R.C. Stude

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